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Recognizing People of the Prehistoric Southwest

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Copyright: November 2016
Trim: 8 1/2 x 10
Pages: 288 pp.
Illustrations: 113 illus., 5 maps

PAPER
978-1-60781-529-7
$29.95
Trade

eBOOK
978-1-60781-530-3
$24.00

Recognizing People of the Prehistoric Southwest

Jill Neitzel, with contributions by Ann L. W. Stodder, Laurie Webster, and Jane H. Hill

Archaeology / Anthropology

If you had traveled from one community to another in the prehistoric Southwest, you would have observed tremendous diversity in how people looked and spoke. This volume is the first to look at how prehistoric people’s appearance and speech conveyed their identities. Southwest archaeologists have previously studied identity using architecture, ceramics, textiles, and jewelry. This colorful book uses a holistic, comparative approach to consider all aspects of appearance. Advocating a people-centered perspective for studying the past, Neitzel and her colleagues show how these characteristics conveyed information about an individual’s social status, cultural affiliation, inter-group connections, religious beliefs, and ceremonial roles.


Jill Neitzel is associate professor of anthropology at the University of Delaware.


Contributors:

Ann L. W. Stodder, Museum of New Mexico, and Department of Anthropology, The University of New Mexico
Laurie Webster, University of Arizona
Jane H. Hill, School of Anthropology, University of Arizona (emerita)


Praise and Reviews:

“Fills a niche of intelligent books about archaeology understandable by students and nonarchaeologists. The only other books of this sort are those that simply describe some kind of material culture (sandals or jewelry); this book is refreshingly different because it draws together several lines of evidence and makes sense of them.”
—Michelle Hegmon, professor of anthropology, Arizona State University

“This is the first broad-based comparison that focuses on these particular perspectives—how the ancient people of the Southwest looked and talked at different points in time. There is plenty of food for thought in all of the chapters.”
—Catherine S. Fowler, Foundation Professor Emerita, Anthropology, University of Nevada, Reno

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