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Ice, Fire, and Nutcrackers

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Copyright: October 2014
Trim: 6 x 9
Pages: 408 pp.

PAPER
978-1-60781-362-0
$24.95
Trade

eBOOK
978-1-60781-363-7
$20.00

Ice, Fire, and Nutcrackers

A Rocky Mountain Ecology

George Constantz

Nature and Environment

Why do quaking aspens grow in prominent clumps rather than randomly scattered across the landscape? Why and how does a rufous hummingbird drop its metabolism to one-hundredth of its normal rate? Why do bull elk grow those enormous antlers?

Using his experience as a biologist and ecologist, George Constantz illuminates these and other remarkable slices of mountain life in plain and engaging language. His provocative accounts of birds, insects, rodents, predators, trees, and flowers are sure to stir the reader’s curiosity. Who wouldn’t be intrigued by a rattlesnake’s ability to hunt in total darkness by detecting the infrared radiation emitted by a mouse? Or the adaptations of white-tailed ptarmigan that allow them to thrive in their high, treeless alpine environments—even through the winter? The narratives, often brought home with a counterintuitive twist, invite readers to make new connections and broaden perspectives of a spectacular outdoor place.


George Constantz is an independent ecologist with special interest in fishes, streams, and watersheds. He has invested over twenty years working with grassroots watershed organizations to develop their scientific and organizational capacities. He has taught biology and ecology at both the high school and university levels. His first book, Hollows, Peepers, and Highlanders: An Appalachian Mountain Ecology, is now in its second edition.


Table of Contents:

Introduction
1. Nutcracker’s Brain
2. Lupine’s Defense
3. Paintbrush Parasites
4. Eat Me!
5. Lodgepole Cones
6. Aspen Clones
7. Sex-Reversed Katydids
8. Optimizing Bumblebees
9. Flickering Butterflies
10. Axolotls
11. Tadpole Kin
12. Scent of a Mouse
13. The Ultra-Overwinterer
14. Hummingbirds Micromanage Their Energy
15. Hay-Stacker
16. Two Fat Marmots, One Fat Rock
17. Intimidating Bitches
18. The Counterintuitive Grizzly
19. The Bearded Climber
20. Antler Indicators
21. Rock Artists
22. Themes
23. Land Lines
Epilogue
Thank Yous
Names of Plants and Animals Glossary
References
The Author
Index


Praise and Reviews:

“Guidebooks and those on the nature of native plants and animals often have one persuasion: to contribute as a reference/ fact source. This book goes much beyond that. The general reader will find that its strength, beyond fascinating reading, will be the ‘why’ things are the way they are. A well-rounded introduction to the Rockies.”
—James Platz, Department of Biology, Creighton University

“I know of no other book quite like this one. I think anyone involved with teaching others about ecology and natural history in the Rockies would like Constantz’s book as a reference.”
—Dennis Knight, Professor Emeritus, Department of Botany, University of Wyoming

“The author creates a good naturalist's tale for each organism he addresses. These tales are based on his own keen field observations, anecdotes, facts, and a good grasp of the mechanisms of biological evolution… The narratives are scholarly and entertaining.”
—Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research


“An engaging narrative… His work captures evolutionary biology in action.”
—CHOICE


“This book will find satisfied readers among scientists, teachers, hikers, and anyone interested in the organisms found on this planet.”
—Southeastern Naturalist

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