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People of the Water

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Copyright: July 2012
Trim: 7 x 10
Pages: 320
Illustrations: 118 illus., 10 maps, 14 tables

CLOTH
978-1-60781-148-0
$40.00s
Short

eBOOK
978-1-60781-219-7
$32.00

People of the Water

Change and Continuity among the Uru-Chipayans of Bolivia

Joseph W. Bastien

Anthropology

People of the Water is an ethnographic analysis of the cultural practices of the Uru-Chipayans—how they have maintained their culture and how they have changed. The Chipayans are an Andean people whose culture predates the time of the Incas (c. AD 1400), but they were almost wiped out by 1940, when only around 400 remained. Yet their population has quadrupled in the last 60 years. Joseph Bastien has spent decades living with and studying the Chipayans, and here for the first time he discusses the dynamics between traditional, social, and religious practices and the impending forces of modernity upon them. With the support of more than 100 illustrations he documents how, in spite of challenges, the Chipayans maintain ecological sustainability through an ecosystem approach that is holistic and symbolically embedded in rituals and customs.

Chipayans have a resilient and innovative culture, maintaining dress, language, hairstyle, rituals, and behavior while also re-­creating their culture from a dialectic between themselves and the world around them. Bastien provides the reader with a series of experienced observations and intimate details of a group of people who strive to maintain their ancient traditions while adapting to modern society. This ethnographic study offers insightful, surprising, and thoughtful conclusions applicable to interpreting the world around us.


Joseph W. Bastien is a Distinguished Scholar Professor of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Texas, Arlington. He has lived and worked among the Bolivian peoples of the Andes since the 1960s and is author of several ethnographic publications, including Mountain of the Condor: Metaphor and Ritual in an Andean Ayllu.


Table of Contents:

List of Figures
List of Tables
Foreword by Mauricio Mamani Pocoaca
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Journey to Santa Ana de Chipaya
Lorenzo’s Cure
History of Chipaya
Subsistence and Economy: Ritual, Mythology, and Practice
People of the Common
Modernization: Changing Chipayans
Ayllus Tajata and Tuanta and the Uru-Chipayan Nation
Inez’s Burial
Fiesta of Santa Ana
Comparisons and Conclusions: Reinvention of Uru-Chipayan Culture

Appendix
References
Index


Praise and Reviews:

“Bastien’s scholarship is meticulous and sound. It should appeal to a broad general audience due to a growing interest in indigenous cultures as well as Bastien’s engaging writing style and the way in which he involves the reader in the complexities of anthropological field work.”
—Douglas Sharon, director (ret.) of the P.A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley

"This book is a summary of half a lifetime of ethnographic research and is a valuable addition to the literature on Andean peoples."
—Hispanic American Historical Review

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