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Environmental Change and Human Adaptation in the American Southwest

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Copyright: 2006
Trim: 7 x 10
Pages: 359 pp.
Illustrations: 72 figures, 26 tables

CLOTH
978-0-87480-853-7
$45.00
Short

Environmental Change and Human Adaptation in the American Southwest

Edited by David E. Doyel and Jeffrey S. Dean

Anthropology / Archaeology

Archaeology provides an ideal avenue for examining long-term processes and interrelationships between human behavior and environmental stability, variation, and change. The American Southwest is particularly well suited for such "deep-time" investigations because of its comprehensive archaeological record, rich ethnographic and historical data on its peoples, and unmatched reconstructions of multiple environmental variables across a broad range of spatial and temporal scales.

This volume contains a varied and instructive set of studies of human behavioral adaptation to environmental change in the ancient Southwest. It makes significant contributions to southwestern prehistory, settlement pattern studies, agriculture, behavioral ecology, paleo-environmental reconstruction, and statistical and computer-aided modeling. The mix of case studies and syntheses covers the Colorado Plateau, Sonoran Desert, Mogollon Highlands, and Rio Grande Valley and summarizes the work of some of the leading researchers in the region.


David E. Doyel owns and operates Estrella Cultural Research and is adjunct faculty in anthropology at Arizona State University.

Jeffrey S. Dean is professor of dendrochronology (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research) and professor of anthropology at the University of Arizona, and curator of archaeology for the Arizona State Museum.



Contributors:

Julio L. Betancourt, Darrell Creel, Jeffrey S. Dean, David E. Doyel, Fred Espenak, Paul R. Fish, Suzanne K. Fish, Gary S. Funkhouser, Donald A. Graybill, David A. Gregory, George J. Gumerman, W. Bruce Masse, Fred L. Nials, James A. Parks, J. Jefferson Reid, Anthony H. Ruter, Ann Clair Seiferle-Valencia, Alan H. Simmons, Alan P. Sullivan III, Michael R. Waters


Table of Contents:

List of Figures
List of Tables
Preface

1. Culture, Environment, and Adaptation: Perspectives from the Ancient Southwest
2. Early People, Early Maize, and Late Archaic Ecology in the Southwest
3. Prehistoric Human Response to Landscape Change in the American Southwest
4. Cross-cultural Perspectives on Prehispanic Hohokam Agricultural Potential
5. Long-Term Streamflow Reconstructions, River Channel Morphology, and Aboriginal Irrigation Systems along the Salt and Gila Rivers
6. Subsistence Management Strategies in the Grasshopper Region, East-Central Arizona
7. Settlement History and Environmental Variability in the Upper Little Colorado River Valley, Arizona
8. Subsistence Stress and Food Storage at Kiet Siel, Northeastern Arizona
9. The Effects of Environmental Fluctuations on Ancient Livelihoods: Implications of Paleoeconomic Evidence from the Upper Basin, Northern Arizona
10. Environmental Variation and Prehistoric Culture in the Mimbres Area, Southwestern New Mexico
11. Tree Rings, Drought, and the Pueblo Abandonment of South-Central New Mexico in the 1670s
12. Sky as Environment: Solar Eclipses and Hohokam Culture Change
13. The Resurgence of the Co-evolution of Human and Natural Landscape Studies in the American Southwest

References
Contributors
Index


Praise and Reviews:

"An excellent contribution to our understanding of human ecology and the prehistory of the American Southwest"
—Daniel Larson, California State University, Long Beach

"The authors should be commended for the excellent job the chapters do in showing how environmental change can be used to strengthen our understanding of the past, as all of the social and political processes took place within a variable context that significantly influenced the trajectory of human response. Of interest not only to Southwestern researchers, but to researchers anywhere who want to see how they can astutely examine human-environment interactions."
Journal of Field Archaeology

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