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Standing Flower

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Copyright: 2001
Trim: 6 x 9
Pages: 279 pp.
Illustrations: 19 illus.

CLOTH
978-0-87480-689-2
$24.95
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Standing Flower

The Life of Irving Pabanale, an Arizona Tewa Indian

Edited by Robert A. Black

American Indian

Standing Flower—Irving Pabanale's Tewa name—was born in the latter part of the nineteenth century into a rich and unique heritage. Around 1700 his Tewa ancestors migrated from the Rio Grande to the Hopi community of First Mesa. They came at the invitation of the Hopi to serve as warrior-protectors against marauding Utes, a relocation exceptional in the history of the Pueblo southwest. Not only did the Arizona Tewa fulfill their military and later police duties, eventually a number of them served as brokers or intermediaries between Hispanic and Anglo culture on the one hand and Hopi culture on the other, through it all preserving their language and much of their Rio Grande way of life.

Irving Pabanale was no exception, working on the tribal police force, serving as a judge, and then becoming a medicine man. Toward the end of his life, between 1966 and 1969, he recorded a series of reminiscences and folktales in consultation with Robert Black. In this volume, Black has compiled these episodes, adding relevant historical and anthropological commentary.

This is a unique chronicle of the life of culture broker who witnessed the great changes that took place in Hopiland during the early and middle years of the twentieth century.


Robert Black is emeritus professor of anthropology at the University of California at Berkeley.


Table of Contents:

Acknowledgments
Introduction

PART ONE: Standing Flower
The Coming of the Tewas
The Early Years
A Trip to Zuni and Other Adventures
Becoming a Policeman
"Blossom Bride": A Dramatization of a Traditional Hopi Wedding
Becoming a Medicine Man
The Indian Reorganization Act
Becoming a Judge
Stock Improvement on the Reservation
A Trip to Taos with Nelson: Nelson's Illness
Trouble with the Navajos: The Land Dispute
Becoming a Mormon: Faith in a Puppy
Alcohol Problems
Speech to the Crowd at Walpi Snake Dance

PART TWO: Folktales
The Boy Who Became a Girl (Hopi)
How the Red Eagle Got a Bellyache (Tewa)
How the Coyote Cubs Became Spotted (Tewa)
Sunflower Girl (Hopi)
How the Coyote Got Fooled (Tewa)
The Coyote and the Bluebirds (Tewa)

PART THREE: Editor's Notes
The Aftermath of the Migration
The Early Years: Boarding School and the Problems of Culture Change
Trading
Rabbit Hunting
The Indian Police
Medicine Men
Troubles with the Navajos and the Establishment of the 1882 Area
The Results of the Indian Reorganization Act: The Hopi Tribal Council
Judge Pabanale and the Tribal Court
Becoming a Mormon
Alcohol on the Reservation
The Smoki Dancers of Prescott, Arizona

Appendix 1. Migration Accounts
Appendix 2. Drilling for Oil on the Reservation
Notes
References
Index

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